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10 REASONS WHY
A HOME FOR HOPE

REASON
#01

Often we need assistance to read; with accessible digital content, we can do it ourselves.

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REASON
#02

It takes me minutes to research online what would normally take me half a day by braille

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REASON
#03

I can learn about my health and where to get healthcare with ease when I use the internet

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REASON
#04

I want to be able to read the Constitution of Kenya for myself. There is none in braille.

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REASON
#05

Financial services are online but I cannot access it to make it easier to manage my finances

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REASON
#06

I need local information but it is not easily accessible to the blind online.

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REASON
#07

I want to listen to Kenyan music, comment and share my thoughts like you do

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REASON
#08

The internet inspires you. I want that inspiration for myself.

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REASON
#09

Braille textbooks are an expensive and limited resource but online, there is more content that is affordable for all

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REASON
#10

The internet is full of advice and tips inside blogs and forums, unfortunately, I cannot access that wealth of knowledge

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10 REASONS HOW
A CAUSE FOR CONCERN

REASON
#01

Accessible websites make online banking both easy and confidential for People With Visual Impairment.

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REASON
#02

Making legislation and various policies available online makes governance accessible for those with visual impairment

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REASON
#03

Braille or QR codes for medicine labels enable persons with visual impairment to take medicine independently

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REASON
#04

Providing confidential medical information online is vital in the maintenance of privacy and independence.

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REASON
#05

For job seekers, there is great empowerment in making the job listings accessible to the visually impaired

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REASON
#06

Providing information in sports can empower the visually impaired to enable them join national teams

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REASON
#07

Talking signs give audio feedback that makes entertainment spots fun for the visually impaired

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REASON
#08

Online shopping is an opportunity for all Kenyans, making websites accessible gives us access to all the offers and discounts that others have.

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REASON
#09

Creating an app for social media? Make buttons keyboard-friendly so your visually impaired fans can participate!

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REASON
#10

Holidays are meant for all. The visually impaired need to access the services conveniently.

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KENYAN FACTSHEET

KES 500

The cost of a white cane. Flexible ones cost KES 1500 apiece.

1986

Year children with visual impairment were first admitted into a public day primary school

KES 4,000

Cost of a Pep kit, the equivalent of a geometrical set vs KES 200 for sighted pupils

KES 9,000

Cost of a ream of Braille paper vs KES 500 for print paper

9

Number of special schools for the blind in Kenya

1.4%

Percentage of Kenyan population who have a form of visual impairment

KES 60,000

Cost of Braille machines

KES 20,000

Cost of assistive technology that makes computers accessible

KES 400,000

Cost of an 18-cell note taker, useful for persons with visual impairment to take notes

541

Number of public schools in which integration has occurred (of over 25,000 schools in Kenya)

GALLERY

All for one, one for all. Pupils line up before starting class.
Raised pavements act as landmark guides, helping the visually disabled find their way
The key is in the details. Labelling in braille goes a long way in improving accessibility for the visually impaired
Guide posts! Yellow paint illuminates the way for visually impaired pupils with albinism
A textbook lies on a desk to be shared between two Std. 8 classes. For sighted students, the book costs KES 800. For the visually impaired, itís KES 10,000
A friend in me. Pupils with poor vision are paired with pupils who are fully blind, to guide them through their surroundings
Laundry day! Three visually impaired girls share a walk to the tap as they prepare to wash their clothes
Primped and tucked. Inside the preparatory pupils\' dormitory
A numbers chart made by attaching charcoal blocks to a sack hangs in the preparatory classroom
A story book modified by adding transparent braille lays invitingly for an eager pupil to discover its tale
A walking cane leans against a desk. Such canes are often too expensive and the pupils sometimes have to improvise with long sticks
Building blocks. Some of the instruments used in preparatory classes
Musical instruments lay on a table top ready to inspire pupils
A corner designated for learning numbers holds the instruments that include bottle tops and a numbers chart
A shelf is stocked to its ends with various toys and instruments used to learn
Yum! Lunch time meal with a side order of avocado
Lean on me. Three boys head to the dormitory after classes
Discovery time! Pupils investigate a camera tripod for the first time
Two girls use the pavement to make their way through the school to the dining hall
Time for class. The bell ringer sets the dayís activities into motion
Two girls play after classes by talking to each other through the pipe railing
Back to class. Two pupils find their way back to class
Pupils take notes in class as the coveted text books lay adjacent ready for homework
A braille slate in use. It costs KES 2,500 including a stylus to write with. As such, it is consider
An abacus in use. This small but vital instrument costs KES 2,000. Many pupils are forced to share a
Guide posts! Yellow paint illuminates the way for visually impaired pupils with albinism
Pupils wait for class to start.
A braille machine rests on a desktop. Because of the scarcity of the device, pupils have to be content using a slate and stylus
A pupil reads aloud in class
A visually impaired pupil takes a close look at his coursework
A Smart Brailler that has speech features. The device is too costly to supply most pupils with it. At a cost of KES 100, 000+, this machine is a luxury
A pupil studies his notes
Computer lessons inside the computer lab, supported by InAble
An ordinary brailler being used for studies. One of these braillers costs between KES 60,000 and KES 70,000